Affiliated Faculty, Associate Professor, Department of Art History, Visual Art, and Theory

Dr. Monteyne teaches the art history and media cultures of Renaissance Italy and Northern Europe, of Counter-Reformation Rome, 16th and 17th century Spain and Spanish America, and the Northern European urban and courtly cultures of the 17th century.

Joseph Monteyne’s first book, The Printed Image in Early Modern London: Urban Space, Visual Representation, and Social Exchange, was published by Ashgate in 2007. A second book, From Still-Life to the Screen: Print Culture, Display, and the Materiality of the Image in Eighteenth-Century London was published by Yale University Press in 2013. His third book, Media Critique in the Age of Gillray: Scratches, Scraps, and Spectres, was published at the beginning of 2022 by the University of Toronto Press. Professor Monteyne has also published articles on seventeenth-century European painting and print culture, including indigenous representation in New France, as well as twentieth-century art in England and Europe, contemporary independent magazine culture, and American popular imagery. He has also written some contemporary art criticism, specifically catalogue essays for the VAG/ Museum London exhibition Myfanwy MacLeod, or There Again (Black Dog, 2014) and for Alex Tedlie-Stursberg (Trapp Projects, 2022). Professor Monteyne’s next research project focuses issues of water and the environment in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries Britain and colonial America.

Dr. Monteyne teaches the art history and media cultures of Renaissance Italy and Northern Europe, of Counter-Reformation Rome, 16th and 17th century Spain and Spanish America, and the Northern European urban and courtly cultures of the 17th century. Recent graduate seminars include ‘Earth, Sea, and Sky: Relational Environments Drawn in Deep Time’, ‘Transhumans, Animals, and Monsters: Renaissance/Early Modern Hybrids’, ‘Vision and its Discontents: Iconophobia, Iconophilia, Iconoclash’, ‘The Visual Culture of Knowledge: Early Modern Art and Science’, ‘The Expanded Field of Early Modern Sculpture’, ‘The Grotesque: Persistence of a Cultural Form’, and ‘The Ecstasy of Violence: Pain and Pleasure in Early Modern Visual Culture’.

Joseph Monteyne – Department of Art History, Visual Art & Theory (ubc.ca)